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PLANS: Jetex 100
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Model Aircraft Plans for the Jetex 100

Although one of the first Jetex motors to be marketed, the 100 did not prove to be a highly popular motor with designers. Hence, there is not a great number of plans for model aircraft using this motor.

We present here a representative selection of models designed for the Jetex 100.

  What you'll find here:
Gloster Meteor (1948)
Jetwing (1948)
Swish (1948)
Jetex Job (1949)
Twin Boom 100 (1950)
Convair XF-92A (1951)
Ackerman's 100 (1953)

Aquilon (Modèle Magazine, 1955)


Gloster Meteor by Aeromodeller staff

Click image to view or download enlarged dimensioned plan and building and flying hints
- Aeromodeller, June 1948 (p 355)




This was the very first plan published for any Jetex motor.

Intended to show off the virtues of the new form of model propulsion, the plan was published in the June 1948 issue of Aeromodeller.

The photograph to left is taken from a composite illustration alongside the article that accompanied the plan. The illustration was captioned as "flying shots of the Meteor demonstrating its scale appearance", but is surely highly retouched.
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Jetwing by Bill Dean

Click image to view or download enlarged dimensioned plan and building and flying hints from Bill Dean



- Model Planes Annual 1949 (p. 44)

Bill Dean was quickly off the mark with models for the new Jetex motors that had come on the market in June 1948. Besides designing the Skyjet 100 kit for Keilkraft, he also designed this simple sheet flying wing for the 100 unit. It was published in November 1948 in the first of a new series of Model Aviation publications which Bill edited with Ron Warring.

Flown at the first Jetex contest at the 1948 Isle of Man Rally, Jetwing gained second place. At the same rally, it also gained fourth place in the Flying Wing Power event, "bearing out our opinion", said Bill, "that Jetex models stand a good chance in open power events."


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Swish by Bill Winter

Click image to view or download enlarged dimensioned plan and building and flying hints from Bill Winter

- Model Airplane News, Nov. 1948 (p. 27)


The credit for designing the first Jetex plan published in the United States belongs to Bill Winter. Bill's plan for Swish was published just five months after the first Jetex motors were released onto the market. It took its name from the new powerplant's "gentle hissing sound, more like a swish".

For Bill, "this ship proved the most interesting and unusual project yet encountered". As for Swish's flying capabilities, Bill wrote:

"Make no mistake, the Swish will put up good flights. It is capable of a minimum of 75 feet altitude under power without soaring (which it does very well) and a duration of at least 1½ min."

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Jetex Job by Henry Struck

Click image to view or download enlarged dimensioned plan and building and flying hints from Henry Struck

- Air Trails Pictorial, Feb. 1949 (p. 67)

Henry Struck was another American who was quick off the mark with a Jetex design. Early experiments by Wilmot Mansour and I.C.I. had demonstrated the suitability of tailless models for Jetex power, and Henry followed this lead with his Jetex Job. He expressed his excitement about the potential for novel designs, as well as an impressive grasp of the novel characteristics of the new form of model motive power:

"Radically new and exciting designs are possible with this power supply. The reduction of drag assumes prime importance, as the ratio of the exhaust velocity to the model velocity determines the efficiency at which the motor is operating. Weight must be kept at a minimum, to permit the model to accelerate rapidly, without wasting the thrust available. The Jetex unit fits neatly into the idea of a low-drag design. A pusher installation produces a sleek fuselage, with the small engine diameter of one inch fully cowled, provided cooling airflow over the unit is maintained."

Henry enjoyed "many excellent flights" with what he acknowledged was an experimental design, intended "to test the ability of the Jetex unit".

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Twin Boom 100 by Bill Gough

Click image to view or download enlarged dimensioned plan and building and flying hints

- Model Airplane News, July 1950 (p.31)

Bill Gough "demonstrates two-handed launching technique, turning ship sideways to show Jetex unit". Writing in 1950, Bill tells of his delight in discovering the potential of Jetex 100 power:

"Upon receiving a Jetex 100 solid charge jet motor, the author was intrigued with its possibilities, and later set it up on a test stand with a small household fan tossing air towards the little engine for cooling.

" Lo and behold! The thrust output was found to be excellent for its size. It was decided to mount this jet engine on a previous design, a "high start" twin boom glider model which had been developed by the writer during the war."

The result was this novel twin boom flyer, which "will climb steeply and steadily in a wide circle until it is very high up"
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Convair XF-92A by Lloyd Mosher

Click image to view or download enlarged dimensioned plan


- Air Trails, May 1951



On his plan, Lloyd Mosher names his little RTP model the Consolidated Vultee XF-92A. Consolidated Vultee became Convair, and the full-size craft is better known under that manufacturer’s name.
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Jetex 100 by Al G Ackerman

Click image to view or download enlarged dimensioned plan and building and flying hints

- Frank Zaic’s Model Aeronautic Year Book, 1953 (p. 104)


Al Ackerman (of Windsor, Ontario, Canada) said of his design for Jetex 100 power:

"Climbs straight out at 45 or completes one turn to right under power. Glide: Very wide rlght turn. Duration: 90 secs. or a little better in still damp evening air."
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Aquilon from Modèle Magazine (1955)

Click image to view or download enlarged dimensioned plan and building and flying hints

Aquilon

- Modèle Magazine, June 1955 (p. 13)

This plan for the French version of the De Havilland Sea Venom, made by Sud-Est under license, was published in a special issue of Modèle Magazine in June 1955, devoted to jet aircraft. The editorial, which began by claiming “The jet pilot is the superman of our age”, said, “We'd like to give youngsters the opportunity to gain a foothold in the world of jets by making true jet powered models, which fly just like their full-size counterparts. By doing this, we hope we can arouse in today’s readers a desire to join the ranks of the supermen of tomorrow.”
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Acknowledgements

Plan and information source:
- Gloster Meteor: article and plan from the MAAC archives, via Bill Henderson
- Jetwing: article and plan from the MAAC archives, via Bill Henderson
- Jetex Job: article and plan from the MAAC archives, via Bill Henderson
- Twin Boom 100: article and plan contributed by Bill Henderson
- Convair XF-92A: plan contributed by Carlo Godel
- Ackerman's 100: article and plan contributed by Bill Henderson
- Aquilon: article and plan contributed by Pierre Claudy

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